Logo

Apple TV’s Ted Lasso is like a cheat sheet for being a good leader. Today we look at a Fast Company article that highlights 5 times Ted Lasso reminded us what great leadership looks like.

I add a few at the end for Health IT leaders. Hope you enjoy.

https://www.fastcompany.com/90669002/5-times-ted-lasso-reminded-us-what-great-leadership-looks-like

Transcript

Today in health, it leadership lessons from a tad lasso. That's right. I'm going to go there. I won't be the last one to go there. It's such a great show. I highly recommend it. Today we're going to take a look at a fast company article that talks about the leadership lessons from Ted lasso. My name is bill Russell. I'm a former CIO for a 16 hospital system.

And creator of this week and health, it. Tailed dedicated to keeping health it staff current and engage. I want to thank our sponsor for today, serious healthcare. They reached out about this time last year and said, we love what you're doing, and really appreciate your mission to develop the next generation of health leaders. The rest is history, as they say, if you believe in our mission and want to support the show, please shoot me a [email protected]

All right. There's an article in fast company that I pulled up and it's five times Ted lasso reminded us what great leadership looks like. Let me give you my 2 cents on this direction. I talked about this on the news day show. Ted lasso is one of my favorite shows right now. And I'm not the only one clearly won a ton of Emmys and people are talking about it. It's one of the few shows.

That if you're in a group of people, And you say Ted lasso, you'll find people are watching it and you can have a conversation. It's been a while since there's been a show like that. So it's really fun. I like the show.

Before you take my recommendation, you should know that there's a fair amount of language in the show. I think it's appropriate and it fits. The characters and how they use it. And there are some suggestive sexual items in there, no sex scenes, but there are some suggestive things. And so I put that disclaimer out there, but again, I think it is well worth the time here you go. Five times, Ted lasso reminded us what great leadership.

Apple TVs. Ted lasso is like a cheat sheet for being a good leader. Good buzz about the show. Starring Jason Sudeikis as an American football coach in London, resulted in a streaming services, big premier viewership to date. And it won a bunch of Emmys as we've talked about as fans, why they love the show and you'll hear a familiar refrain, it's a bright spot and a painful world. The writing is sharp and manages to be optimistic wise and hilarious without being cloying. I'm not sure what cloying is, but it's not that each of the characters has flaws and weaknesses that keeps them from becoming characters.

And a recent episode that paid homage to romantic comedies funnier and clever than it sounds that lasso declared, I believe in rom communism. The philosophy that everything will work out in the end, even if it's not the way you think it would. All right. So here's the five lessons that he gets.

The first one is be curious, not judgmental in the first year. There's a high stakes game of darts. Ted is facing off against his bosses. Ex-husband billionaire Rupert Mannion maintenance lost the ownership of his beloved soccer club through the divorce, Richmond AFC, and in the settlement. His ex wife, Rebecca gets the club, the billionaire challenges last. So two game of darts and the two.

To decide to make a wager. If Manian wins, he can pick the player lineups for the last two games of the season. If lasso wins Mannion is banned from the owner's box, giving Welton. Relief from his harassment during the game, Ted uses the famous Walt Whitman quote. Be curious, not judgmental to explain why curiosity.

Is more effective than close-minded judgment and uberous had maintenance, simply asked a few questions such as have you played a lot of darts? He would have learned that lasso was an ACE.

The coach, then punctuates his point with a game winning bulls-eye. And that is a great scene and I'm not going to spoil too many things for you. The second one is benched bad actors. There's a player on the team that is a bad actor. And he has a difficult conversation. He benches the player and obviously there's a lot of drama around that. When you think about leadership, when you think about what we have to do as leaders in health, it, we have to identify the bad actors. And I can't tell you how many times I've come in and the bad actors are the best players.

They just act poorly. They think they're above it. And they really ruined the dynamic of the team. And if you're looking for the whole of the team to be better, sometimes you have to bench the bad actors. Number three, admit when you're wrong and apologize. And I think this is one of the beautiful things.

In this show is that you see different people apologize. And I think there's a lost art of that. These days of saying the wrong thing. Thinking about it over time. And then coming back to that person and saying, Hey, you know what, I'm really sorry. I did that. And so that is one of the lessons that comes out of this.

The fourth one is believe a single word, emblazoned on a yellow sign, hung with duct tape over the coach's office. Believe reminds everyone in the locker room, the power of belief. Belief in oneself belief in the team, belief in ideals and goals. And each definition of the word

lasso hangs the well worn yellow sign in the locker room. In the pilot episode. Jones points out that is crooked and directs him. As he tries to fix it, they read that it's perfect. But when the camera pans back, we see that it's just as a skew as it was when it started.

And this essentially is the point that belief doesn't have to be perfect. It just has to be present. And the last thing is kindness matters.

If there's one constant theme throughout the show, it's that kindness is a powerful force. Good things happen when the characters are decent, respectful. And do the right things. Gruff tough soccer. Legend, Roy Kent. Has a nurturing and caring side. That endears him to Jones. Nice Phoebe and a circle of wine, drinking, yoga moms with whom he occasionally watches reality TV.

Devoted family, man and team communication manager, Leslie Higgins. Has a moment of redemption when he stands up for himself and ends up in a better place. And the mysterious coach beard. Ted lasso. His assistant shows us the value of wise and steadfast friends. Of course, there are other messages. If you look hard enough,

Promoting Shelley to the coaching staff position because of his passion and knowledge is a great example of developing and rewarding talent. Dr. Sharon Fieldstone, borderline miraculous healing abilities are not to the importance of self care, especially with regard to mental health. And Danny Rojas reminds us.

That the world is filled with mucho, mucho joy. If you look for it again, I love this show. I hope you get the opportunity to watch it. Drop me a line. Let me know what you think as you watch it. Let me let me turn this to health. It, one of the lessons that I would take from Ted lasso is that you don't have to be the best footballer or soccer player, depending on which side of the Atlantic you're on to coach the sport.

This is one of the first obstacles for any CIO. Your job is leadership. First and foremost. Leadership is about leading. What do leaders do?

Leaders make sure the team is functioning well integrated communicating funded and prepared for the work that is coming towards them and leaders steps out in front on some things. And leads from behind on others and has to discern. Which is required at the right time. Leaders have to see where things are going and prepare the way.

A task oriented person, struggles in leadership leaders tackle the unknown and even create the future that no one can even imagine yet. When Ted inherits the team, he sees potential. He sees people not functioning well together, even though they are at the top of their sport. The leaders that have always impressed me the most are the ones that turn around a team, not the ones that fire and hire their way to a better team. Any mullet can do that. And I've done it a bunch of times in my career. Now I'm talking about the ones that can take the team that they've been given. Spend time to identify the highest and best talent that each person brings to the table and put them in a position to succeed.

They have the tough conversations, but they do it in a way that in the end moves people to a better place for themselves and the organization. I've known these leaders and they are amazing people with empathy, compassion, and vision.

I'll leave you with this. Ted lasso is an optimist, but he is not naive. He believes the best in people, but the worst does not surprise him. It disappoints him, but it does not wipe him out. We need more Ted lasso in the world. People who believe, who are curious and are not judgmental and who show kindness to a cynical world. If you haven't seen the show again, I highly recommend it. That's all for today. If you know someone that might benefit from our channel, please forward them a note. They can subscribe on our website this week, health.com or wherever you listen to podcasts, apple, Google, overcast, Spotify, Stitcher, you get the.

Picture we are everywhere. We want to thank our channel sponsors who are investing in our mission to develop the next generation of health leaders. VM-ware Hill-Rom 📍 starboard advisers, McAfee and Aruba networks. Thanks for listening. That's all for now.

Want to tune in on your favorite listening platform? Don't forget to subscribe!

Thank You to Our Show Sponsors

New Shows for 2022

Insights - This Week Health
This Week Health Town Hall
Keynote - This Week HealthSolution Showcase This Week Health
Newsday - This Week HealthToday in Health IT - This Week Health

Related Content

Amplify great thinking to propel healthcare forward and raise up the next generation of health leaders.

© Copyright 2021 Health Lyrics All rights reserved